The individual growth response optimisation medical device

iGRO is Pfizer’s first multi-lingual software medical device. It is a web-based medical device that complies with all relevant European and local data protection regulations. It makes it easy to apply these algorithms in clinical practice — enabling physicians to predict how much a child may grow in the first and subsequent years of GH therapy.
It is designed to support you in calculating growth predictions for a range of pre-pubertal and pubertal patients, and provides evidence-based guidance and justification for GH treatment decisions.

iGRO can be used to calculate growth predictions for a range of patients.

For children with idiopathic growth hormone deficiency (IGHD)1 and children born small for gestational age (SGA)2:

      Predictions for the first to 8th pre-pubertal year of treatment

      Subsequent pre-pubertal years

      Total pubertal growth.
 

For girls with Turner syndrome (TS)3:

      First to 7th pre-pubertal year of growth hormone treatment

      Total pubertal growth.

 

iGRO requires only standard data that is routinely collected during clinic visits:

      Birth date

      Gender

      Primary diagnosis

      Birth weight

      Parents’ heights

      Height

      Weight

      Treatment start date

      GH dose

 

As well as some additional information for patients with idiopathic GH deficiency (IGHD) or Turner syndrome (TS), and for short children born small for gestational age (SGA) 

iGRO prediction algorithms can explain up to 70% of variability in growth responses4

      30–70% for children with IGHD

      30–68% for girls with Turner syndrome

      30–52% for short children born SGA

 

iGRO gives you an assessment of the patient’s innate capacity to grow in response to GH treatment by calculating the index of responsiveness (IoR) at the end of the first year of treatment. 
At the start of treatment, iGRO aids assessment of a child’s potential to respond to GH, based on his or her baseline characteristics. 

Response can be monitored and optimised during the first year of treatment, using the iGRO growth chart where yearly growth predictions are displayed clearly alongside the child’s growth curve before and during treatment. This enables physicians to monitor the effect of GH treatment by comparing a child’s predicted and actual growth responses to GH each year.  

After the first year of treatment, iGRO indicates the patient’s capacity to respond by calculating the index of responsiveness (IoR): a valuable parameter that determines long-term outcomes.

 

 

1- Ranke, Michael B., et al. "Derivation and validation of a mathematical model for predicting the response to exogenous recombinant human growth hormone (GH) in prepubertal children with idiopathic GH deficiency." The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism 84.4 (1999): 1174-1183; Ranke, Michael B., et al. "Accurate long-term prediction of height during the first four years of growth hormone treatment in prepubertal children with growth hormone deficiency or Turner Syndrome." Hormone research in pædiatrics 78.1 (2012): 8-17; Ranke MB et al. Increased response, but lower responsiveness, to growth hormone (GH) in very young children (aged 0-3 years) with idiopathic GH Deficiency: analysis of data from KIGS. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2005 Apr;90(4):1966-71; Ranke, Michael B., et al. "The mathematical model for total pubertal growth in idiopathic growth hormone (GH) deficiency suggests a moderate role of GH dose." The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism 88.10 (2003): 4748-4753; Ranke, Michael B., and Anders Lindberg. "Prediction models for short children born small for gestational age (SGA) covering the total growth phase. Analyses based on data from KIGS (Pfizer International Growth Database)." BMC medical informatics and decision making 11.1 (2011): 38.

2- Ranke, Michael B., and Anders Lindberg. "Prediction models for short children born small for gestational age (SGA) covering the total growth phase. Analyses based on data from KIGS (Pfizer International Growth Database)." BMC medical informatics and decision making 11.1 (2011): 38; Ranke, Michael B., et al. "Prediction of response to growth hormone treatment in short children born small for gestational age: analysis of data from KIGS (Pharmacia International Growth Database)." The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism 88.1 (2003): 125-131; Ranke, Michael B., Anders Lindberg, and KIGS International Board. "Observed and predicted total pubertal growth during treatment with growth hormone in adolescents with idiopathic growth hormone deficiency, Turner syndrome, short stature, born small for gestational age and idiopathic short stature: KIGS analysis and review." Hormone research in paediatrics 75.6 (2011): 423-432..

3- Ranke, Michael B., and Anders Lindberg. "Prediction models for short children born small for gestational age (SGA) covering the total growth phase. Analyses based on data from KIGS (Pfizer International Growth Database)." BMC medical informatics and decision making 11.1 (2011): 38; Ranke, Michael B., et al. "Prediction of response to growth hormone treatment in short children born small for gestational age: analysis of data from KIGS (Pharmacia International Growth Database)." The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism 88.1 (2003): 125-131; Ranke, Michael B., Anders Lindberg, and KIGS International Board. "Observed and predicted total pubertal growth during treatment with growth hormone in adolescents with idiopathic growth hormone deficiency, Turner syndrome, short stature, born small for gestational age and idiopathic short stature: KIGS analysis and review." Hormone research in paediatrics 75.6 (2011): 423-432; Ranke, Michael B., et al. "Prediction of long-term response to recombinant human growth hormone in Turner syndrome: development and validation of mathematical models." The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism 85.11 (2000): 4212-4218.

4- Ranke, Michael B., et al. "Derivation and validation of a mathematical model for predicting the response to exogenous recombinant human growth hormone (GH) in prepubertal children with idiopathic GH deficiency." The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism 84.4 (1999): 1174-1183; Ranke, Michael B., et al. "Accurate long-term prediction of height during the first four years of growth hormone treatment in prepubertal children with growth hormone deficiency or Turner Syndrome." Hormone research in pædiatrics 78.1 (2012): 8-17; Ranke, Michael B., et al. "The mathematical model for total pubertal growth in idiopathic growth hormone (GH) deficiency suggests a moderate role of GH dose." The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism 88.10 (2003): 4748-4753; Ranke, Michael B., and Anders Lindberg. "Prediction models for short children born small for gestational age (SGA) covering the total growth phase. Analyses based on data from KIGS (Pfizer International Growth Database)." BMC medical informatics and decision making 11.1 (2011): 38; Ranke, Michael B., et al. "Prediction of response to growth hormone treatment in short children born small for gestational age: analysis of data from KIGS (Pharmacia International Growth Database)." The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism 88.1 (2003): 125-131.